Infineon CoolSET™ – Embedded Power in Home Applications

5th Generation CoolSET™ –
high efficiency, integrated power stage IC

Infineon’s CoolSET™ offer high performance with the integration of latest 700/800V CoolMOS™ P7 power MOSFETs and provide the auxiliary SMPS full system solution, ideal for home appliances.

With Infineon and Avnet Silica as your partner, you will be able to focus on the functionality which distinguishes your major home appliance designs without worrying about the need to develop complex power supplies. Read more about Infineon’s integrated solutions for embedded power and lighting in major home applications.

CoolSET™ is available in both through-hole and SMD packages and thereby eliminates the need of heatsink and reduces BOM count with a small footprint. In addition to the typical output protection such as output short, overload and over-voltage protection, the 5th generation controller is incorporating additional protections to detect abnormal line input conditions such as over-voltage and under-voltage protection.

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Key Features

• Integrated 700 V and 800 V superjunction MOSFET with avalanche capability
• Comprehensive suite of protection which include input OVP, brown in/out, pin short to GND and OTP with hysteresis
• Innovative quasi-resonant switching scheme to minimize frequency spread under different line input conditions

Key benefits

• High efficiency with latest CoolMOS™ P7 family and quasi-resonant switching scheme
• Auto-restart recovery scheme to minimize interruption to system operation
• Extensive protection coverage to increase system robustness
• Rapid start-up performance with cascode configuration

Win a free demo boards

Evaluate the performance of the 5th generation quasi-resonant CoolSET™ ICE5QR2270AZ and its ease of use in off-line switched mode power supply (SMPS) with Infineon’s 24 W 12 V power supply demo board. Your design needs lower voltage? Then go for Infineon’s 15 W 12 V and 5 V power supply demo board which hosts another 5th generation quasi-resonant CoolSET™ – the ICE5QR4770AG.

Register for a chance to win one of the boards.

Save 12% on select tools

Save 12% on select tools and
free shipping during Kilby Week with
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SimpleLink™ Sub-1 GHz CC1312R Wireless Microcontroller (MCU) LaunchPad™ Development Kit   NEW  

The SimpleLink™ Sub-1 GHz CC1312R wireless microcontroller (MCU) LaunchPad™ development kit with Sub-1GHz Rado, which offers long-range connectivity, combined with a 32-bit ARM® Cortex®-M4F processor on a single chip










Register Now for What’s New in Electronics Live

Don’t miss your chance to network, engage, learn and connect at What’s New in Electronics Live!

This year’s WNIE Live will deliver a comprehensive 2 day event covering the whole spectrum of the electronics industry. With dedicated conferences and exhibition opportunities for the Embedded and EMC industries, as well as electronics manufacturing, WNIE Live really is the one essential event of the year for anyone involved in electronics. Can you afford to miss out?

We all know exhibitions remain a vital part of bringing business to life, nothing beats the energy of a face-to-face meeting or the thrill of seeing a machine in a live environment and delivering the latest technologies and standards.

At WNIE Live in September, customers and vendors will enjoy a unique experience that allows them to meet the right people, make connections, network, and hopefully, have some fun.


The event runs in Hall 1 of The NEC from 25th – 26th September and is free to attend with ample parking, plus visitors will receive free wifi throughout the whole venue.

Here are some of the key highlights you can look forward to:

•An international exhibitor list of over 100 companies showcasing a host of products and services from all corners of the electronics process

•2 full days of technical content & training brought to you by the EMC UK Expo and Embedded Live Exhibition and Conference

•UK debut of the IPC Connected Factory eXchange (CFX) Live Showcase with live demos running daily at 11:00 and 14:30

•WNIE TV roundtable debates covering a range of pertinent industry topics

•The Electronics Industry Awards, 2018 is the launch of this exciting new awards scheme

•The IPC Hand Soldering Competition – the winner is sent to compete at the Global HSC in San Diego USA

Female Leaders in Tech Europe Networking Event

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If you are involved in Electronics Development, Production, Components, Systems and Applications then What’s New In Electronics Live is your premier source to meet with Engineers, Designers, Buyers and Decision Makers in the procurement of products and services. It’s not only the name that has changed for this event, What’s New in Electronics Live is supported by the ground breaking What’s New In Electronics Online which reaches a global audience of over 80,000 industry professionals giving exhibitors more outreach than just a traditional exhibition solution.

What’s New In Electronics Live delivers the most highly qualified audience of electronics professionals. Exhibiting enables you to reach this audience in one place at one time. What’s New In Electronics will introduce you to new contacts, however, this is your opportunity to invite both existing clients and prospects to see your products and services in a live environment, it is your shop window.

In an online world this is a unique opportunity to see, hear and touch What’s New in Electronics.

www.wnie.co.uk/WNIE-live

Win A Red Pitaya Starter Kit with 8-Bit Channel Logic Analyser Pro Add-On

PODCAST: BUILDING BETTER HMIs

Looks at the progression of human machine interfaces (HMIs) and what needs to be done to address the demands of next generation embedded system designs…


PODCAST: A NEW APPROACH TO MOTOR CONTROL VIA CAPACITIVE ENCODER TECHNOLOGY

Find out about the latest advances in encoder technology and the implications they will have for the future of motor control


COMPETITION: WIN A RED PITAYA STARTER KIT WITH 8-CHANNEL LOGIC ANALYSER PRO ADD-ON

We have 5 multifunction units to give away, each worth over 550 Euros ($680) – encompassing oscilloscope, logic analyser & signal generatorfunctions…


NEW PRODUCTS: DC/DC CONVERTER EVALUATION MODULE

Texas Instruments has introduced the TPS62148EVM-034 module, which is designed to help the user easily evaluate the operation and functionality of the TPS62148 DC/DC converter IC. It converts a 3V to 17V input voltage to a regulated output voltage of…


NEW PRODUCTS: LOW POWER CAMERA MODULE FOR EMBEDDED IMAGING

Texas Instruments has introduced the TPS62148EVM-034 module, which is designed to help the user easily evaluate the operation and functionality of the TPS62148 DC/DC converter IC. It converts a 3V to 17V input voltage to a regulated output voltage of…

Analog Devices’ AD215

Isolated amplifier

Galvanic insulation is God‘s gift to man – whether optocoupler or light waveguide line, being able to transfer things without creating a physical connection is extremely valuable. Sadly, most optocouplers are not particularly smart – an aspect Analog Devices seeks to change.

Given that the AD215 is quite complex, let us start out by looking at the block diagram shown in figure 1…

…The AD215 contains a set of largely independent parts

First of all, a supply of both positive and negative 15V is expected. The chip chops it up and hunts the signal over a power isolator, which generates an external isolated voltage supplies. It can then be used to power sundry components which can live with its maximum output of about 10mA.

Secondarily, the main modulator chain is in place. It is responsible for the actual galvanic decoupling and handles signal frequencies of up to 120kHz.

The interesting aspect of the part is that the input to the modulator chain is not a normal buffer – instead, Analog Devices provides users with a full-blown operational amplifier and its feedback pin. That way, the chip can be used to simplify signal conditioning circuits based on operational amplifiers – some can even be created without adding additional components to the system.

Small-scale sensor conditioning – think about small applications which do not demand more than an inverting or a noninverting buffer – can be created without a dedicated Opamp.

Analog Devices long design heritage leads to an excellent datasheet: the twelve pages found here provide four pages worth of schematics and implementation examples.

Return of the SIP

Our AD215 most definitely is not a cheap part – the OEMsecrets best price starts out at around €35, with significant spreads making this one component where price comparisons are really really important. However, the SIP casing, shown in the figure, is easy to integrate – due to its through-hole design, it can be soldered by hand with ease.

SIP cases – good things never die…

Diodes Incorporated’s APX803S-31SA-7 helping you with Voltage Trips

Voltage gatekeeper

Vdd brownouts are among the most common antipodes of microcontroller design – they are especially annoying, as their presence is not easy to detect. Diodes Incorporated provides a new family of easy-to-use supply voltage monitor ICs.

From a principal point of view, the parts are not difficult to understand. Simply connect them to VCC and ground, thereby allowing the chip to keep an eye on the supply. After that, a pull-up resistor is needed to provide current to the open drain active-low reset output which resets the microprocessor.

The addition of the resistor shown in figure one is intentional – some (odd or high-end) microcontrollers can also assert the reset line on their own.

…handling brownouts requires but one chip and a resistor

A question of the part number

The lack of external pins limits the configuration possibilities – the part behaves just like you ordered it. One interesting aspect is that Diodes Incorporated provides a series of different voltage levels, which are shown in the table.

…Covered voltage ranges include 2.3 and 5V MCUs

In addition to that, three timeout durations exist – they govern how long the microcontroller is held in reset if a voltage drop out is detected. Their configuration is also shown in figure three…

Diodes Inc also covers you if your microcontroller needs more time to reset itself

The tables can then be used to find out more about the part at hand. We recently saw significant search interest for the APX803S-31SA-7 – it works with a voltage trip level of 3.1V, and has a sleep time of 240ms.

Furthermore, all of the parts boast with an impressively low standby current consumption. The datasheet claims consumption in the range of 10 yA – this should be acceptable, especially when combined with high-end microcontrollers.

Diodes Incorporated uses the SOT23 housing, which is well known from a variety of diodes. With some practice, it can also be soldered by hand for prototyping – in the worst case, use a reflow oven and an adapter PCB.

Panasonic’s popular EXB-28V470JX

It takes two to tango!

Be it pull-up resistors, pull-down resistors or just any other thing – many, if not most PCB designs come with a group of similar resistors. The knee-jerk reaction involves hitting the add a resistor button until the PCB is populated. Resistor networks provide an attractive alternative.

Resistor networks come in families. The most common one is simply a set of resistors which are connected in parallel to one another. A more exotic alternative, which is usually only offered by specialist vendors such as TTElectronics, connects one end of the packages together, thereby creating the bus architecture shown in the figure.

TT Resistors

…A bused resistor network can save time when designing pull-down resistor networks (see here)

We recently saw significant interest in a series of resistor networks created by Panasonic – a popular example would be the EXB-28V470JX. The Japanese vendor offers a wide variety of resistor values and usually provides three different configurations, all of which are shown in the future.

Panasonic sells resistor networks containing two, four and eight individual parts…

Due to the common substrate, resistor networks do a good job at handling terminal problems. If one part heats up, heat dissipates to the remaining parts, thereby ensuring that drifting remains – at least to some extent – the same across all parts. Another obvious benefit is the smaller size – if you play SMD resistors very close to one another, space is wasted between the individual components.

From a price point of view, it a bit of an odd situation. The OEMSecrets price for our part is shown below:

When counting pennies for parts, the resistor network obviously is a bit more expensive – if only because the volume of resistor networks produced pales when compared to classic resistors. On the other hand, keep in mind that pick and place fees also cost money.

Sadly, nothing comes without disadvantages. The first problem with resistor networks is availability – while one can almost always find an SMD resistor somewhere, finding a specific network in the middle of a battle zone or an undeveloped country is difficult. The same applies to finding replacements if the vendor decides to discontinue the component.

When working with high-frequency or high accuracy designs, crosstalk can also become an issue-the common substrate, after all, can act weird as frequencies get high. Finally, keep in mind that a resistor network – by definition – places all of the resistors close together physically. This might not be a big problem for four or six layer boards, but can become critical when dealing with a space-constrained two layer board.

Littelfuse’s RUEF300 Fuse

A fuse which never blows

Surface-mount fuses do a good job at protecting components from burning up – sadly, exchanging them is not a simple task manageable by end users. LittelFuse‘s RUEF series provide an attractive alternative, which is not widely known.

Parts like the RUEF300 are based on the concept of the PTC. Designers switch them in series with the load, meaning that the parts normally have a pretty low resistance (less than 1 Ohm). Current flows through them, their substrate temperature increases by the well-known thermal effect.

While the normal PTC changes its value linearly or exponentially, the resettable fuse jumps when reaching a specific temperature. At this point, the resistance increases dramatically, thereby dissipating most – but not all (!!!) – current through the load. When the overload situation ceases, the substrate cools off and restores normal current flow.

This makes PTC resettable fuses ideally suited for all cases where stupidity can cause transient shorts. A classic example would be a USB port – users tend to plug in things which they should not. Protecting the hub with a PTC is the best course of action: once the offending peripheral is removed, normal operation resumes without customer service action.

Beware of the consequences

The large thermal capacitance of the part leads to a relatively slow switching process – while a normal fuse can switch out in less than a second, the part on hand can take up to 10 seconds in a worst-case scenario. Our figure shows the problem: as the ambient temperature changes, the jump point changes too – in some cases, the tripping current can half itself.

…PTC Resettable Fuses are not well-suited to precision applications

A practical example

Now that we got the classic principle of function sorted, let us look at a practical example. The RUEF300 mentioned in the introduction can handle 30V DC or AC and is guaranteed to survive to either 100A DC or 70A RMS.

Switching takes place at a trip current of 6A, with the hold current level being set at 3A. In clear words, 3A can flow through the part forever. A current of 6A causes the part to trip eventually. The emphasis is on eventually: When loaded with 15 Amps, LittelFuse promises that the switching will take less than 10.8 seconds – not a fast part by any means.

Wurth’s 150353 LED Family

LED, meet Plant

One of the issues making underground real estate unpopular with engineers is the lack of the ability to grow plants. Artificial lighting has low efficiency – recently, Würth introduced a set of LEDs targeted to the needs of plants.

High school biology teaches that photosynthesis requires the presence of light. In practice, not every light will do – instead, particular plants have particular pigments, which do not respond to some spectral elements. Würth‘s (smart) reasoning is that farting out unneeded spectral components is a waste of energy and a sure-fire way to cause thermal problems. Thus, their LEDs emit light only in very tight spectral dimensions.

Wurth Color Spectrum

…from a plant‘s point of view, some lights shine brighter than others

Persons familiar with technical optics recognize that most of the efficient color ranges would be perceived as red and blue – three parts cover the important parts of the spectrum:

150353DS74500

150353HS74500

150353FS74500

If price is not an issue or optimum efficiency is required, the company provides additional light sources with infrared and various forms of normal day- and night light. One especially interesting one is the 158353040, whose light intensity is described as moonlight. Interior designers can use these to spruce up night-light installations.

Those interested in finding out more about which LEDs to choose for the plant in question are served by an application note written by a famous biologist. The PDF file, available here, provides an overview of the various questions at hand.

One interesting aspect of the part is a very uncommon land design shown in figure two. The part has two electric and one thermal pad which must be connected to some kind of thermal heatsink.

Finally, be advised to wait when chasing these LEDs. Würth recently performed a significant upgrade of the materials used, leading to higher light output per part.

The land layout of Würth‘s LEDs is quite odd…

Wurth Land Layout