GRT188R60J226ME13D & VJ0805G226MXYTW1BC – The Benefits of MLCC Capacitors Part II

MicroCrystal RV-8803 – A Really Accurate RTC June 17, 2019- RTC chips traditionally were the domain of Maxim and NXP. Switzerland-based MicroCrystal recently made quite a buzz with its RV-8803, which offers simple integration, an I2C interface and extreme accuracy. Let us start out by looking at a system overview. Figure one shows how this I2C RTC is made up internally – interested observers note […]
Analog Devices’ LTM2887 – If a Digital Bus Needs Galvanic Isolation June 15, 2019- In theory, digital buses are intended to connect things to one another. Sadly, one sometimes wants but a logical connection – in many cases, galvanic isolation helps out. Should you ever feel like isolating very fast buses, definitely give the LTM2887 a chance. From a technical point of view, Linear Technologies attempt at entering the […]
AVAGO APDS-9008 or APDS-9005-020 – Keeping an Eye on Ambient Light June 14, 2019- Recent times saw quite a bit of interest for part numbers such as the APDS-9008 or APDS-9005-020 – they are a very interesting type of ambient light sensor. One of the oldest questions in regards to light sensors involves their spectral sensitivity. If a part is to output but one voltage level, the conversion between […]
STMicroelectronics’ LIS2DH12 – Low Power Motion Sensing June 12, 2019- Apple’s iPhone introduced gyroscopic sensors to a wider range – before that, accelerometers were not commonly found in consumer hardware. STM sells excellent parts which, however, get little media attention – time to take a look at the LIS2DH12. Integrating the part into your circuit as an MPU6500 alternative or MPU9500 alternative is not difficult. […]
Panasonic AMG8833 – FLIR for cheap June 7, 2019- FLIR made infrared thermal sensors cool – sadly, their parts are all but cheap (and suffer from export control problems). Panasonic’s Grid-EYE family is a low-resolution alternative which comes at significantly lower cost. From a technical point of view, Panasonic’s image sensor could not be simpler. We are looking at an 8×8 sensor with an […]
DipTronics DTS-62R-V – Small Switch, Very Big (and Very Cheap) June 5, 2019- When yours truly was but a lowly cadet, various US manufacturers produced (pricey but quite reliable) switches. Chinese vendors recently started to catch up – seeing the DTS-62R-V top our customer interest list shows that the run stage of the crawl-walk-run cycle is reached. DipTronics has been around the Asian switch market for ages, exhibiting […]

As discussed last week, MLCC capacitors will provide a variety of benefits to designers willing to use them…

As discussed last week, MLCC capacitors will provide a variety of benefits to designers willing to use them. However, recent developments have shown stock levels to become critical. The trade press and analysts are assuming that the situation will remain in a similar state for the foreseeable future. Fortunately, designers can react to this with a variety of behaviours.

Let us start out with the obvious one…

Electrolytic capacitors have improved a lot during the last few years. The problems seen on Danaher’s Tektronix TDS5xx/7xx series of oscilloscopes or in Boeschert power supplies will happen only if you use extraordinarily low quality parts. If your application allows it, using a low ESR electrolytic capacitor is a nice way to stay clear of the entire MLCC conundrum.

 

Should the larger weight or cost of electrolytic capacitors be unacceptable, going with the flow is an attractive choice. Companies such as Vishay, who are specialized on the automotive market, usually tend to be less squeezed than their consumer-oriented competitors. For example, a GRT188R60J226ME13D currently has a lead time of 36 weeks, while the VJ0805G226MXYTW1BC is available more easily (20 weeks).


OEMsecrets search, would then, allows you to minimize the distributor margin impact, allowing you to mitigate the total cost impact on your BOM – in some cases, price adjustments have made “consumer” parts more expensive than their automotive counterparts.

Smaller is better

Reputable German sources claim that Murata switched their manufacturing equipment away from classic case sizes such as 0805 or 1206, and instead prefer smaller ones such as 0402. From a person looking at raw materials, this decision makes good sense; the smaller the capacitor, the smaller the amount of rare earths required for its fabrication.

If your entire manufacturing takes place using pick and place machines, no significant action is required. Simply open your favorite EDA program, and reduce the size of the component footprints. 0603 size chips can be soldered by hand with good magnification.

Stockpiling works

Finally, the big question remains; should you stockpile parts, or should you not? Let’s start out with the obvious; with a tool such as OEMsecrets, your trawling net is significantly wider than that of the normal developer who is trying to source components from one or two distributors by hand.

This, however, does not mean that it does not make sense to stockpile parts. If your customer is willing to pay you for it, acting as a commis can be highly profitable. Having
a stockpile of a few thousand components is helpful also in that you can send them off later using the broker such as Kruse. On the other hand, most stockpiling operations fail for two reasons. First of all, companies tend to overfill their stocks anticipating demand which never crops up. Problem number two is the often insufficient quality of the stock-holding facilities – if you store capacitors wrongly, they might still be usable, but will be refused by reputable third-party stock resellers.